Follow these instructions to create a bootable Clear Linux* OS USB drive based on your OS.

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Requirements:

  • Use a 16GB or larger USB drive.

Create a bootable USB drive on Linux

Verify the integrity of the Clear Linux OS image

Before you use a downloaded Clear Linux OS image, verify its integrity. This action eliminates the small chance of a corrupted image due to download issues. To support verification, each released Clear Linux OS image has a corresponding SHA512 checksum file designated with the suffix -SHA512SUMS.

  1. Download the corresponding SHA512 checksum file of your Clear Linux OS image.

  2. Start a terminal emulator.

  3. Go to the directory with the downloaded image and checksum files.

  4. Verify the integrity of the image and compare it to its original checksum with the command:

    sha512sum -c ./clear-[version number]-[image type].[compression type]-SHA512SUMS
    

If the checksum of the downloaded image is different than the original checksum, a warning is displayed with a message indicating the computed checksum does not match. Otherwise, the name of the image is printed on the screen followed by OK.

For a more in-depth discussion of image verification including checking the certificate see Image content validation.

Decompress the Clear Linux OS image

Released Clear Linux OS images are compressed with either GNU zip (.gz) or XZ (.xz). The compression type depends on the target platform or environment. To decompress the image, follow these steps:

  1. Start a terminal emulator.

  2. Go to the directory with the downloaded image.

    To decompress an XZ image, enter:

    unxz clear-[version number]-[image type].xz
    

    To decompress a GZ image, enter:

    gunzip clear-[version number]-[image type].gz
    

Burn the Clear Linux OS image onto a USB drive

Caution

Burning an image formats the USB drive, thus destroying all existing content. Backup your data before proceeding.

  1. Open a terminal emulator and get root privilege.

    sudo -s
    
  2. Go to the directory with the decompressed image.

  3. Plug in the USB drive.

  4. Identify the USB drive using the lsblk command. This shows all drives attached to the system, including the primary hard disk. In the example output below, there are 4 drives (/dev/sda, /dev/sdb, /dev/sdc, and /dev/sdd) attached, where /dev/sda is primary drive in this case. The remaining are 3 USB drives. The output also shows the mounted partitions (under the MOUNTPOINT column) for each drive.

    lsblk
    

    Example output:

    NAME   MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
    sdd      8:48   1    15G  0 disk
    ├─sdd2   8:50   1     5G  0 part /run/media/user1/960c184f-3bb7-42b7-bcaf-0c1282
    ├─sdd3   8:51   1     8G  0 part /run/media/user1/704f3382-b26d-4f34-af1b-cb9aab
    └─sdd1   8:49   1     2G  0 part
    sdb      8:16   1  14.8G  0 disk
    └─sdb1   8:17   1  14.8G  0 part /run/media/user1/PATRIOT_USB
    sdc      8:32   1   7.3G  0 disk
    └─sdc1   8:33   1   7.3G  0 part /run/media/user1/LINUX MINT
    sda      8:0    0 335.4G  0 disk
    ├─sda4   8:4    0    28G  0 part
    ├─sda2   8:2    0   3.7G  0 part [SWAP]
    ├─sda7   8:7    0     6G  0 part /home
    ├─sda5   8:5    0     1G  0 part /boot
    ├─sda3   8:3    0   954M  0 part /boot/efi
    ├─sda1   8:1    0    28G  0 part
    ├─sda8   8:8    0    30G  0 part /
    └─sda6   8:6    0   7.9G  0 part [SWAP]
    
  5. Before an image can be burned onto a USB drive, it should be un-mounted. Some Linux* distros may automatically mount a USB drive when it is plugged in. To unmount, use the umount command followed by the device identifier/partition. For example: From the above lsblk output, /dev/sdd has 2 mounted partitions. To unmount them, enter:

    umount /dev/sdd2
    umount /dev/sdd3
    
  6. Burn the image onto the USB drive. The command-line example below burns an uncompressed image onto /dev/sdd:

    dd if=./clear-[version number]-[image type] of=/dev/sdd bs=4M status=progress
    

Create a bootable USB drive on macOS*

Verify the integrity of the Clear Linux OS image

Before you use a downloaded Clear Linux OS image, verify its integrity. This action eliminates the small chance of a corrupted image due to download issues. To support verification, each released Clear Linux OS image has a corresponding SHA512 checksum file designated with the suffix -SHA512SUMS.

  1. Download the corresponding SHA512 checksum file of your Clear Linux OS image.

  2. Start the Terminal app.

  3. Go to the directory with the downloaded image and checksum files.

  4. Verify the integrity of the image and compare it to its original checksum with the command:

    shasum -a512 ./clear-[version number]-[image type].[compression type] | diff ./clear-[version number]-[image type].[compression type]-SHA512SUMS -
    

If the checksum of the downloaded image is different than the original checksum, the differences will be displayed. Otherwise, an empty output indicates a match and your downloaded image is good.

Decompress the Clear Linux OS image

We compress all released Clear Linux OS images by default with either GNU zip (.gz) or xz (.xz). The compression type we use depends on the target platform or environment. To decompress the image, follow these steps:

  1. Start the Terminal app.

  2. Go to the directory with the downloaded image.

  3. Use the gunzip command to decompress either compression type. For example:

    gunzip clear-[version number]-[image type].xz
    gunzip clear-[version number]-[image type].gz
    

Burn the Clear Linux OS image onto a USB drive

Caution

Burning an image formats the USB drive, thus destroying all existing content. Backup your data before proceeding.

  1. Launch the Terminal app.

  2. Go to the directory with the decompressed image.

  3. Plug in a USB drive and get its identifier by entering the command diskutil list. See Figure 1.

    diskutil list
    
    Get USB drive identifier

    Figure 1: macOS* - Get USB drive identifier

  4. Unmount the USB drive identified in the previous step. The command-line example below umounts /dev/disk2:

    diskutil umountDisk /dev/disk2
    
  5. Burn the image onto the drive using the dd command. The command-line example below burns an uncompressed image onto /dev/disk2:

    sudo dd if=./clear-[version number]-[image type] of=/dev/rdisk2 bs=4m
    

    Adding an ‘r’ in front of the disk identifier should help speed up the imaging process.

    You can press <CTL>-T to check imaging progress.

  6. Eject the USB drive.

    diskutil eject /dev/disk2
    

Create a bootable USB drive on Windows*

Verify the integrity of the Clear Linux OS image

Before you use a downloaded Clear Linux OS image, verify its integrity. This action eliminates the small chance of a corrupted image due to download issues. To support verification, each released Clear Linux OS image has a corresponding SHA512 checksum file designated with the suffix -SHA512SUMS.

  1. Download the corresponding SHA512 checksum file of your Clear Linux OS image.

  2. Start Command Prompt.

  3. Go to the directory with the downloaded image and checksum files.

  4. Get the SHA512 checksum of the image with the command:

    CertUtil -hashfile ./clear-[version number]-[image type].[compression type] sha512
    
  5. Manually compare the output with the original checksum value shown in the downloaded checksum file and make sure they match.

Decompress the Clear Linux OS image

Released Clear Linux OS images are compressed with either GNU zip (.gz) or XZ (.xz). The compression type depends on the target platform or environment. To decompress the image, follow these steps:

  1. Download and install 7-Zip.

  2. Go to the directory with the downloaded image and right-click it.

  3. From the pop-up menu, select 7-Zip and select Extract Here as shown in Figure 1.

    7-Zip extract file

    Figure 1: Windows 7-Zip extract file.

Burn the Clear Linux OS image onto a USB drive

Caution

Burning an image formats the USB drive, thus destroying all existing content. Backup your data before proceeding.

  1. Download the Rufus utility to burn the image onto a USB drive.

  2. Plug in the USB drive and open Rufus.

  3. Click the SELECT button. See Figure 1.

    Rufus utility - Click the SELECT button

    Figure 1: Rufus utility - Click the SELECT button

  4. Find and select the previously extracted Clear Linux OS image file. Then, click the Open button. See Figure 2.

    Rufus utility - Show and select |CL| image file

    Figure 2: Rufus utility - Show and select Clear Linux OS image file

  5. Click the START button. See Figure 3.

    Rufus utility - Click the START button

    Figure 3: Rufus utility - Click START button

Return to install from live image

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